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UCCE Master Gardeners of San Bernardino County

In the News

Worth Their Weight in Gold, Silver and Bronze...

This photo of a newly eclosed monarch won a bronze award in the ACE competition. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When a story is worth its weight in gold, and a photo is worth its weight in silver and bronze...according to the judges... Two communicators based at the University of California, Davis, and affiliated with the UC Agriculture and Natural Resources, won...

Got Milkweed? Bees Like It, Too!

A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta (aka

The Bohart Museum of Entomology at the University of California, Davis, stocks a "Got Milkweed?" t-shirt in its gift shop. In real life, insects "get" milkweed. We all know it's the only host plant of the monarch butterfly--where monarchs lay their...

Posted on Thursday, June 15, 2017 at 3:28 PM

The Flora and the Fauna at the Old State Capitol

A Western tiger swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) spreads its wings on the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Erected in 1852, this historic building was ostensibly intended for Benicia City Hall. Offered as the state capitol and promptly accepted, it had that honor from February 4, 1853 to February 25, 1854. Deeded to the state in 1951, it was one of the four...

Posted on Wednesday, June 14, 2017 at 4:29 PM

Pollen Power

Gold dust? No, this is pollen covering the thorax of this female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, nectaring on the passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The conversation usually starts like this: "I saw this huge, huge bumble bee with yellow on its back. It was buzzing like crazy." Often it's not a bumble bee, but the Valley carpenter bee,  Xylocopa varipuncta, that's been foraging on the blooms...

Posted on Tuesday, June 13, 2017 at 5:02 PM

Surprising Research Results: What the Microbes in Nectar Revealed

Researchers studied the microbes in the nectar of the sticky monkeyflower, Mimulus auranticus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's surprising what the microbes in nectar can reveal. Take the nectar of the sticky monkeyflower, Mimulus auranticus. UC Davis community ecologist Rachel Vannette and colleague Tadashi Fukami of Stanford University decided to examine microbial...

Posted on Monday, June 12, 2017 at 5:03 PM

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