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Lady Beetles Know Where to Lay Their Eggs

Good Planning: A lady beetle laid her eggs  (right) next to oleander aphids (left) on a tropical milkweed plant. The lady beetle larvae will eat the aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ladybugs--actually "lady beetles" as these insects are beetles--know exactly where to lay their cluster of eggs--where the aphids and other prey are. Thoughtful of the moms, isn't it? Moms are like that.  Look on or under your rosebush leaves....

Good Planning: A lady beetle laid her eggs  (right) next to oleander aphids (left) on a tropical milkweed plant. The lady beetle larvae will eat the aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Good Planning: A lady beetle laid her eggs (right) next to oleander aphids (left) on a tropical milkweed plant. The lady beetle larvae will eat the aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Good Planning: A lady beetle laid her eggs (right) next to oleander aphids (left) on a tropical milkweed plant. The lady beetle larvae will eat the aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle and larva. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A lady beetle and larva. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle and larva. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle larva eating an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A lady beetle larva eating an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle larva eating an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, September 30, 2020 at 4:14 PM
Tags: lady beetles (41), ladybugs (44), milkweed (40), rose bushes (2)
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

Green Hall: Fitting Tribute to Two Scientists

UC Davis geneticist Mel Green in his lab in 1967, and outside the future Green Hall, 2011. (UC Davis photos)

It's a fitting tribute to see the UC Davis Life Sciences Building recently renamed the Melvin M. and Kathleen C. Green Hall. The building, which houses the UC Davis College of Biological Sciences' research laboratories, faculty and staff,...

Photographic illustration shows the Life Science Building's new name as it will appear above the doors. (UC Davis illustration)
Photographic illustration shows the Life Science Building's new name as it will appear above the doors. (UC Davis illustration)

Photographic illustration shows the Life Science Building's new name as it will appear above the doors. (UC Davis illustration)

Posted on Tuesday, September 29, 2020 at 2:53 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

UC Davis Spider-Naming Contest: We Have a Winner!

This is the female of the species,Cryptocteniza kawtak. (Image by Jason Bond)

Remember when UC Davis Professor Jason Bond discovered a new genus of trapdoor spider on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County, and launched a naming contest for the species? The contest, beginning in mid-May and ending...

This is the female of the species,Cryptocteniza kawtak. (Image by Jason Bond)
This is the female of the species,Cryptocteniza kawtak. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the female of the species,Cryptocteniza kawtak. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the male of the species, Cryptocteniza kawtak. (Image by Jason Bond)
This is the male of the species, Cryptocteniza kawtak. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the male of the species, Cryptocteniza kawtak. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is where UC Davis Professor Jason Bond discovered the new genus and species of a trapdoor spider. (Illustration by Jason Bond)
This is where UC Davis Professor Jason Bond discovered the new genus and species of a trapdoor spider. (Illustration by Jason Bond)

This is where UC Davis Professor Jason Bond discovered the new genus and species of a trapdoor spider. (Illustration by Jason Bond)

UC Davis alumnus Kirsten Pearsons, a
UC Davis alumnus Kirsten Pearsons, a "proud Aggie," surveys the Russell E. Larson Agricultural Research Center at Rock Springs; this is Penn State's research farm. She holds a doctorate in entomology from Penn State.

UC Davis alumnus Kirsten Pearsons, a "proud Aggie," surveys the Russell E. Larson Agricultural Research Center at Rock Springs; this is Penn State's research farm. She holds a doctorate in entomology from Penn State.

Posted on Monday, September 28, 2020 at 5:41 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources

Beekeepers Among Those Benefiting from Vacaville Fire Art Project

Artist Lisa Rico painted this photo of lavender and bees for the Vacaville Fire Art Project she founded. It's titled

Some lost everything: Their homes, their barns, their farm animals, their bees, their livelihoods. The recent wildfire that roared through rural Vacaville, reaching the outer edges of the city, seared the souls of the victims but what's happening...

Artist Lisa Rico painted this photo of lavender and bees for the Vacaville Fire Art Project she founded. It's titled
Artist Lisa Rico painted this photo of lavender and bees for the Vacaville Fire Art Project she founded. It's titled "Making Honey" and was purchased by Andrea Hofmann-Miller. Among fire victims were beekeepers and Girl on the Hill Boutique Vineyard and Lavender.

Artist Lisa Rico painted this photo of lavender and bees for the Vacaville Fire Art Project she founded. It's titled "Making Honey" and was purchased by Andrea Hofmann-Miller. Among fire victims were beekeepers and Girl on the Hill Boutique Vineyard and Lavender.

A honey bee buzzes over a sunflower in this painting,
A honey bee buzzes over a sunflower in this painting, "Sun-Bee" by Lisa Rico for the Vacaville Fire Art Project. This one was purchased by Tiffany Murdaca.

A honey bee buzzes over a sunflower in this painting, "Sun-Bee" by Lisa Rico for the Vacaville Fire Art Project. This one was purchased by Tiffany Murdaca.

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, climbs the stalk of a sunflower in this painting by Lisa Rico, founder of the Vacaville Fire Art Project. It's titled
A lady beetle, aka ladybug, climbs the stalk of a sunflower in this painting by Lisa Rico, founder of the Vacaville Fire Art Project. It's titled "Sun's Going to Shine Again" and was purchased by Aumrey Moland.

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, climbs the stalk of a sunflower in this painting by Lisa Rico, founder of the Vacaville Fire Art Project. It's titled "Sun's Going to Shine Again" and was purchased by Aumrey Moland.

Honey bees forage in a field of lavender in this painting, titled
Honey bees forage in a field of lavender in this painting, titled "Honey Makers," by Lisa Rico. It was sold to Joie Moralde, with proceeds benefitting fire victims.

Honey bees forage in a field of lavender in this painting, titled "Honey Makers," by Lisa Rico. It was sold to Joie Moralde, with proceeds benefitting fire victims.

A monarch butterfly flutters through a field of lavender. Painting by Lisa Rico. This one is titled
A monarch butterfly flutters through a field of lavender. Painting by Lisa Rico. This one is titled "Monarch Muse."

A monarch butterfly flutters through a field of lavender. Painting by Lisa Rico. This one is titled "Monarch Muse."

Posted on Friday, September 25, 2020 at 3:21 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Of Monarch Eggs, Ladybug Eggs and Oleander Aphids

Monarch eggs are usually one to a leaf, but sometimes Mama Monarch deposits multiple eggs on a single leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So you're growing milkweed for the first time--or found some milkweed--and you're trying to figure out how to identify a monarch egg. Monarchs lay their eggs on the underside of milkweed leaves--generally--but we've seen them on stems and on the leaf...

Monarch eggs are usually one to a leaf, but sometimes Mama Monarch deposits multiple eggs on a single leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Monarch eggs are usually one to a leaf, but sometimes Mama Monarch deposits multiple eggs on a single leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch eggs are usually one to a leaf, but sometimes Mama Monarch deposits multiple eggs on a single leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Find the oleander aphids! Monarch eggs and oleander aphids both occupying a leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Find the oleander aphids! Monarch eggs and oleander aphids both occupying a leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Find the oleander aphids! Monarch eggs and oleander aphids both occupying a leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An egg and a newly emerged caterpillar sharing a leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An egg and a newly emerged caterpillar sharing a leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An egg and a newly emerged caterpillar sharing a leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a monarch egg. This image was taken with a Canon MPE-65mm lens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a monarch egg. This image was taken with a Canon MPE-65mm lens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a monarch egg. This image was taken with a Canon MPE-65mm lens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 24, 2020 at 4:45 PM
Tags: aphids (39), lady beetles (41), ladybugs (44), milkweed (40), monarch eggs (1), monarchs (45)
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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